Programs

Bridging Gaps and Cultivating Foundation - A 12-week Program for Refugee High School Girls

[et_pb_section admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_image admin_label="Header Image" src="https://womenofworld.org/wp-content/uploads/There-is-no-greater-agony.jpg" alt="Bridging Gaps and Cultivating Foundation" title_text="Bridging Gaps and Cultivating Foundation" show_in_lightbox="on" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="center" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [/et_pb_image][et_pb_cta admin_label="Call To Action" title="Keep up to date on all of our activities..." url_new_window="off" button_text="Join our newsletter..." use_background_color="on" background_color="rgba(90,144,147,0.7)" background_layout="light" text_orientation="center" disabled="off" disabled_on="on|on|" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_button="off" button_letter_spacing="0" button_use_icon="default" button_icon_placement="right" button_on_hover="on" button_letter_spacing_hover="0" button_url="https://womenofworld.org/newsletter-subscription/"] [/et_pb_cta][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_blurb admin_label="IDDev" title="Module 1: Identity Development" url_new_window="off" use_icon="on" font_icon="%%173%%" icon_color="#168794" use_circle="on" circle_color="#ffffff" use_circle_border="on" circle_border_color="#8300e9" icon_placement="top" animation="off" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_icon_font_size="off" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

  • Self-Identity
  • Social Justice
  • Roots
  • “My Story”

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  • Understanding Gender
  • Healthy Relationships
  • Communication
  • Dating

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb admin_label="Exploration" title="Module 3: Explorations" url_new_window="off" use_icon="on" font_icon="%%289%%" icon_color="#168794" use_circle="on" circle_color="#ffffff" use_circle_border="on" circle_border_color="#8300e9" icon_placement="top" animation="off" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_icon_font_size="off" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

  • What breaks your heart?
  • Voice
  • Expression
  • Community

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  • Sense of belonging
  • Path Through Higher Education
  • Balance
  • Mindfulness Practices

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What happens when you put young women leaders in a room for twelve weeks?

Well, you begin to uncover the details of how stories intertwine, ebb and flow, and collectively culminate power that shines through. Past the anger and the struggle of every day. You see the beauty that illuminates the commitment to not give up and walk a path of uncertainty, but one that needs to be walked.Each one of the 7 young African women has a story to tell and have gone to their growth-edge to make sure that they are heard and not silenced. Each one of them has taken time to critically think and engage in their own level of vulnerability to write a piece of their own story to share hoping that it will create change in the way we react, act, and engage in the SLC community.The learnings that came from this course is meant to be intimate and proactive. We encourage you to come wanting to engage in the experiences of these young women knowing that you will learn from them. We thank you in advance for taking the time and sitting with us, as we tell OUR stories.

Who were the Participants?

In total ten young women participated in the program. They came from two different schools and their age range was 15-18yrs. The recruitment of the program was done through word-of-mouth. Though the program sought to have a more diverse group in school/culture/background/life-story — there was limited time to do adequate recruitment. Each of the recruited young women came into the program with their own set of skills and perspectives. The young women proved to be outstanding group to work with. All women were of African families, some were born in the U.S., and all have the ability to talk about the refugee experience, though many of the young women do not self -identify as refugees.*Note: The program flexed with involvement of initial participants, by the end of the 12 weeks, 3 participants had left, but the program gained one new participant later into the program. Seven women participated in their end-of-program event: We as Women all as Women: Shining light on our stories, creating new narrative, listen to our voices.

Educational Component

All the educational material and lessons were built to dissect four themes in the 12 weeks. Those 4 themes can be seen above in MODULES. All educational material was presented with social justice in the forefront of the classroom. All educational material was pulled from previous knowledge of the facilitator; activities, workshops; websites such as: Teaching Tolerance, and books on education and identity.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_testimonial admin_label="Ruth" author="Ruth Arevalo" url_new_window="off" portrait_url="https://womenofworld.org/wp-content/uploads/13147703_10153537858797967_2952787285045343053_o.jpg" quote_icon="on" use_background_color="on" background_color="rgba(224,182,92,0.42)" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]Why am I here? Where do I fit into this story? Well…My story and body starts at a confluence of blood that historically and phenotypically were determined by hierarchy and power to not match. This means as I grew I was placed in ambuigity and confusion of where I fit in this world.This… Exacerbated by the death of those who brought me into this world. I laid on the floor as a small child looking into the sky while I felt the whole world falling around me breathing in and out….[/et_pb_testimonial][et_pb_text admin_label="Text2" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Identity

The aspects of uncovering the layers of identity were fundamental to programming. Exploring the aspects of our identities that put forth contingencies because society has given us a label.Understanding privilege and our own privilege/or not being able to access certain privileges and how that is wrapped into our identities and how to healthily navigate spaces with this knowledge was prioritized.

Safety and Cohesion

Safe and inclusive space, the importance of feeling safe is dire to creating space for communication, growth, and developmentCreating flexibility and space for all to talk, be heard, and to be ok with tensions or disagreements. We understood that conflict is part of growth and conflict resolution allows cohesion and respect between group members.

Communication

The base of communication that was set up was implemented with intentional time given to build trust. Weekly check-ins at meetings with active listening and feedback along with outside meeting check-ins once a month by phone to continue to develop rapport and depth to the relationship between participant and facilitator.It was monumental to give and provide space for all feelings, thoughts, and actions to be heard, discussed, and validated.Some of the women had a stronger presence, confidence, and base of knowledge to put to their voice, as some were still growing into how they desire to best express themselves and communicate with others.All participants began to engage in what it meant to have courage to stand up for themselves and also gaining comfort in what it meant to ask for help. Most importantly we continued the conversation of how important voice is for women of color.All participants were expected to work together and use their communication skills to work through frustrations and uncertainty to create a public event at the end of the 12 weeks.The event “We as Women All as Women” show cased the importance of story and provided space for each of the young women to capture one characteristic important to them and use spoken word to express it with a critical and profound lens. The open dialogue that was led by the young women at the end of their performance was to engage the public to ask questions about the importance of why their stories should be heard and why they are using their voices to express the changes they want to see from the perspective of being young African women living in the United States in this very pivotal moment in history.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_testimonial admin_label="Saida" author="Saida" url_new_window="off" portrait_url="https://womenofworld.org/wp-content/uploads/Saida.jpg" quote_icon="on" use_background_color="on" background_color="rgba(189,143,232,0.62)" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]At the beginning of the 12 weeks I spent with Ruth and the other 8 girls I was very skeptical of what I was getting myself into. Would I be just wasting my time in a boring club listening to people with monochromatic voices talking about challenges women face? I knew all the challenges women face, I face them every single day of my life. Why did I need to talk about it over and over again? I decided to give the group the benefit of the doubt and just go to one meeting. If I didn’t like it I would just stop coming, it was going to be a piece of cake. I would walk in share a few sad stories, listen to people share a few of their sad stories, and I would be out the door. Boy, was I wrong.As soon as I opened the doors of the building where the meetings were held a strange feeling hit me. This feeling was of comfort and understanding. I knew from that moment that this wasn’t just a club where we would sit talking about our feelings. It was a club where we would take ACTION about our feelings. The other 8 girls and I sat down at the table nervous about what was to come. We didn’t know that this 12 weeks program would make us a family.“When I think of this group I think of one word, Diverse. Not only in that we come from different countries around the world, but also that we all have different opinions and outlooks on the world,” said Naima Dahir a group member.This 12 week journey was a pathway to more knowledge for us girls. We learned more than we have ever learned anywhere, including school.“Topics that were covered where, Identity, including the complexities and intersections of identity/ies. The importance of telling your story. What it looks like to advocate for yourself and intervene when you see or are in the situation of injustice.  We talked about racialized and gendered language as well as aspects of healthy relationships and communication,” said Ruth Arevalo the facilitator of the group.At the end of the program us girls organized and held our own get together. We shared stories, poems, dances, and what everyone loved most, the food. The idea behind the event was to have an open conversation of what we all learned together. It was an event that brought women of color together to  showcase our progress and have a good time. For many of the girls in the group they didn’t have a lot of space to talk about what they go through on a daily basis. This helped open up the discussion.“I feel that our message to our audience was fulfilled. And that individuals left our event that night inspired, ready to make moves, transformed and most importantly label free,” said Heba Geiang a group member.  I am very glad I took the risk and joined this group. It was one of the most amazing experiences that I have ever gone through. Everyday you can make decision that will change your life. Sometimes you hesitate. I am glad my hesitation lasting for only a second, and I dove right in to pave the way to my future life.Learning about Slope in Math class, Literary Devices in English, and Mitochondria in Science are all very important. But none of those topics will establish the foundation of who we are. Identity, Stories, Relationships, and Communication are what makes us human. We are different people than when we started 12 weeks ago, and we have all changed for the better.[/et_pb_testimonial][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Free English Classes - See Calendar for Updated Times

Women of the World is thrilled to announce that we are holding numerous Free English Classes at our new office location.  Our wonderful teachers give an hour or two every week to help refugees improve in this all important first skill that our new neighbors must learn.  If you need help with your English, please consider attending.

Tuesdays at 3:00 p.m. & Saturdays at 11:00 a.m.

Women Of the World Office

3347 S Main Street

Salt Lake City, UT 84115

Phone # 801-953-0008

Meet our Wonderful Teachers

BGMcGill KadenWoolf
B.G. McGill Kaden Woolf

Public Radio Return on Refugee Service Investment

This morning, the Salt Lake City Public radio station KRCL aired a brief interview with Women of the World Founder and Executive Director, Samira Harnish, on the "Return on Investment" that support for the refugee women population can have on the community.The women refugees that make up part of our new neighbor populations here in America have overcome great adversity to start at the bottom in our system, but Women of the World believes that like many immigrants before them, these refugee women will integrate and become self-reliant.As you know from reading this newsletter, Women of the World differentiates itself in the landscape of refugee service by focusing on women still facing issues after their resettlement benefits have expired.  Women of the World builds self-reliance by customizing service to the specific need, working alongside "our ladies" to solve the issue together, and building capacity in English, employment skills, and education.Samira Harnish says, "It can be hard, challenging to overcome a past of violence and oppression, a struggle against poverty in a new home where the rules and language are unfamiliar, but our ladies love it here because they have a chance to keep their kids safe and through hard work, succeed."That is the Return on Investment that Women of the World guarantees the communities it works in.http://www.krcl.org/the-roi-women-of-the-world/

Celebrating Mother's Day with Our New Neighbors

The celebration of those that brought us into the world and that nurture and care for us throughout our lives is a key rite preserved in most cultures.  In America, this rite is celebrated on the most important holiday of all – Mother’s Day.  Many of our new neighbors taking refuge in Utah have a streak of celebrating mothers and grandmothers, even promoting them to the head of the household, but these celebrations do not fall on a specific day.  As WoW has constantly said, we do not ask our ladies to balance two cultures, but to blend them, the best of both… in light of this, we celebrated our 6th Annual Mother’s Day Celebration at the Bud Bailey Housing Complex on Saturday.IMG_8977The event was well-attended even though rain washed out the initial outdoor venue.  Our friends at the Bud Bailey Housing Complex stepped up and opened a space for our use – a real treat for our ladies from all over Salt Lake City to come in from the rain and celebrate together with food and friends.The Mother’s Day event is an opportunity for supporters, volunteers, and other community members to share a meal with our new neighbors and talk about the delicious ethnic potluck food and share in the common loving role they all share as mothers.  Kids and mothers mix between the different ethnicities to share in overcoming their common struggles.IMG_8943This year, Women of the World recognized its first Mother of the Year.  Known simply as Bebe, which is Congolese for grandmother, Bebe was nominated both by the granddaughter she serves as the caregiver for and by WoW staff for her kindness and her calm in the face of the struggles she continues to overcome.  Later that same night, at the Mama Africa Kitoko Fashion Show, Women of the World Founder and Executive Director, Samira Harnish, presented Bebe with an award from the Mama Africa Kontago non-profit as well.  Samira also recognized two other women for their contributions in the service of refugees and for their entrepreneurial vision.Women of the World is continuing to survey the mothers for the classes they want to help themselves and their kids achieve their next step in the community and if you are interested in supporting a legal/human rights or economic empowerment class ranking for these women, pleasesend us an email.IMG_9085Women of the World loves to celebrate with its members and there is no greater focus on the courage and care, the kindness and resolve of our ladies than the celebration around their sacrifice for their children.  Thank you to all of the refugee mothers that make our lives so much more complete.

Follow Your Passion Media features Women of the World

The 2015 Momentum Continues

Women of the World's media momentum continues into 2015 with Nkoyo Iyamba's piece on KSL entitled "Follow Your Passion" in which she highlights Utah citizens that have left careers to pursue something they are passionate about.  Nkoyo led off this series with Women of the World's Founder and President Samira Harnish's story which involves the choice of following her passion to serve and enable women refugees to a level of success like she enjoyed but retired from in her engineering career.  Samira has been successful in academia, in the high-tech industry as a Research & Development engineer, and now as the focal point for the support of refugee women and their families in Utah.The story got picked up by both KSL's website under the title of "Woman helps refugees thrive in Utah" and by Deseret News under the title "Follow your passion: Utahns change careers in pursuit of happiness."  Indeed while it has been difficult to serve with few resources and in a learning as you go mode, Samira has "never been happier or more fulfilled in her life."  The new neighbors that Women of the World supports, according to Samira, "are the real heroes and I appreciate every opportunity to highlight their amazing stories of perseverance and courage."Follow Your PassionWomen of the World is thrilled by the ongoing reporting that Nkoyo Iyamba is focusing on refugee women in Utah and the service women and men that Women of the World is employing to help them achieve their self-reliance.  Nkoyo's commitment to the advancement of all of Utah's diverse community is a service to journalism and to the small nonprofits, like Women of the World, that count on the spotlight that she can shine on our heartfelt activities.

Contract Case Manager

Women of the has the following Contract Case Manager position available in April of 2013.  Please use the contact form at the bottom of this email to request more information.Part Time Case Manager? - Women of the World

  • Five month contract position
  • August 1st, 2014 - December 1st, 2015 (20 weeks)
  • 10 hrs per week/ $12 per hour ($2,400)

Organization Description:Women refugees face the combined threats of:LONG-TERM POVERTY Refugee women face long-term poverty in America.  Within one-year of arriving, their entire family is expected to find gainful employment.  They have few workplace skills and no ‘nest egg’ to draw on.RESTRICTED NETWORKS The countries where refugee ladies come from have little history of integrating women into society and husbands and the male patriarchy are rarely accepting of women networking in professional or academic mixed-gender forums.  Women are cut-off from other women and feel abandoned.ABUSED HUMAN RIGHTS Refugee women often do not have a strong concept of the human rights they deserve and are swindled or deceived if no one is looking.  WoW advocates on their behalf in reforming immigration, reporting housing abuse, and ensuring equal employment opportunities.Women of the World offers solutions to these problems through:CUSTOMIZED ADVOCACY Customized advocacy means getting the job done.  It means following up and building the capacity so it doesn’t happen again.WOMEN NETWORKS We believe that our women know best how to help one another, that they will trust one another because they’ve been through it together.?We provide the path, our women provide the power. By the strength of our example and well-developed programs, we show our women how powerful they are and how they can impact others through thriving after their hardships.Internship Description:Case managers connect clients to employment, health, and social service resources in the community with the goal of helping clients become self-sufficient.The Refugee Case Management Intern will gain valuable experience assisting with a variety of professional duties that contribute to the efficiency of operations within the Customized Advocacy, Practical English, and Financial Empowerment programs.Case Management services include an array of support services such as: referral for health care, child care, housing, utilities assistance, language and vocational training, family wellness training, emergency financial assistance, and transportation and interpreter/translation assistance to help clients access and utilize services in culturally and linguistically appropriate manners.Customized advocacy builds women-to-women networks that empower English education, economic development, and/or human rights for Utah’s refugee women and their families.  Women-to-women networks offer a safe place to build friendships supported by conservative cultures upset by post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) while empowering important gender-based, socio-economic skills that are largely under-realized by refugee women.  WoW’s fieldtrips offer research, planning, and communication at financial, health, nutrition, family, service, and employment venues – skills and contacts needed to navigate Utah’s opportunities.RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Assist program manager with new client intake
  • Assist with social service applications
  • Partner with social service case managers in locating essential resources for clients
    • Attend community meetings as a representative for the Women of the World
    • Attend all WoW office hours
    • Attend all volunteer intake sessions
    • Educate WoW clients in transportation to appointments
    • Help coordinate special events for clients
    • Help coordinate WoW office hours
    • Coordinate client and volunteer data entry
    • Follow-up on reporting requirements from case managers
    • Provide case management services to refugees, asylees, and other displaced persons; services include: coordinating housing, medical appointments, inter-agency referrals, orientation/client education, school enrollments, employment placement and preparation, etc.
    • Manage office clerical duties. Including input of receipts etc into QuickBooks and providing reconciliation of bank accounts to board of directors. (training will be provided)
      • Utilize community resources and programs to assist clients
      • Maintain detailed case file documentation and case notes
      • Prepare reports and ensure program targets and outcomes are met
      • Represent the organization at meetings and other outreach activities
      • Work with volunteers and co-sponsors to assist with services provided to clients
        • Serve as an advocate for clients

 QUALIFICATIONS:

  • At least 18 years of age
  • Sensitivity to the needs of diverse cultural communities
  • Must carry automobile insurance and have a clean driving record.  Must have own reliable transportation.
  • Must have own laptop for use at WoW Office Hours
  • Must be able to maintain confidentiality as it relates to handling client information and fill out a confidentiality disclosure.
  • Must be able to pass a criminal background check
  • Education or experience in Social Work or working with vulnerable populations preferred
  • Must be willing to meet clients in their homes or where the needs exist: government offices, offices of employment etc.
  • Experience working with diverse populations and refugee social service programs desired
  • High English language proficiency required; fluency in an additional language spoken by the client base preferred
  • Computer proficient including Microsoft Office applications (Word, Excel, and Outlook)
  • Capable of working independently with proven experience in achieving goals

[contact-form-7 id="2489" title="Contact-SRH"]

IMFT Job Skills Training

IMFT Strategic Programs Group is joining with Women of the World for its Day of Service to teach job skills to refugee women looking for work in the Salt Lake City area.When: Thursday 29 NovTime : 10am - 1pmWhere: Hser Ner Moo Center 479 East 2250 South, South Salt Lake City, UT 84415womenofworld.org/IMFTjobskills/ Job Skills Training*Session 1: Internet Job SearchSession 2: Resume Writing & WordprocessingSession 3: InterviewingSession 4: General Job Skills (How to do a great job!)*Not an IMFT hiring event

Sexual Violence Prevention

The Human Rights Education Project of the Salt Lake City Community Empowerment group collaborated with the Women Of the World Organization to present a workshop about Sexual Violence Prevention last Saturday.

There were 35 people in attendance at the workshop & five different nationalities (Iraq, Jordan, Nepal, Karenni & Karen).  We had 4 interpreters help to get the information to the ladies and men.  The subjects was very interesting, educational, and helpful to them.  They were all involved with reading the stories and discussing the problems, how to prevent them, and what they would do if they had the problem in their house.  The audience was very lively and involved with the material.  When I gave a ride to the ladies, they were talking about it in the car & thanking me for giving them the opportunity to be involved in this subject.

I appreciate the Mayor's Office for giving us the opportunity to do this workshop.  Thank you very much for Alana Kindness & Stephany Murguia for giving the lecture, it was very valuable and the material was very understandable.  Thank you to Amy Wylie for donating the hygiene products to the audience. Thank you very much for the interpreters, for without them, the material would never be understood. P1030887P1030886P1030888P1030882

Dynamic Grace Home Healthcare Services

“Dynamic Grace Home Healthcare is dedicated to providing healthcare awareness to our diverse population.  We offer compassionate care, give hope, and create a trusting relationship.”

  • Experience Service in Healthcare Over Ten Years
  • Confident Source for Home Healthcare
  • Concern and care for the patient
  • Network and support for the family

MISSION

Dynamic Grace Home Healthcare through well-organized operations makes it easier to do business efficiently by promoting the dignity and self-worth of all clients and making every effort to provide the best clinical care possible.Dynamic Grace Home Healthcare cares for our clients as we care for our own loved ones.Our team provides respect and great service to all of our clients.We make available benefits, services and employment to all persons without regard to national origin, gender, color, ability, religion, age, sexual orientation or race.See our full brochure here.

Governor Herbert: RESTORE DENTAL SERVICES FOR ADULTS ENROLLED IN MEDICAID

Governor Herbert:In the refugee camps, where you struggle to keep the mud and cold out of your tent and are forced to fight for food, poor dental health is a foregone conclusion.  A few of your constituents, individuals who have spent fifteen years or more in camps, now need your help.Let me introduce you to D-, a Bhutanese refugee, one of the forgotten people.  Forced from her home because she is an ethnic minority, Lhotshampas, she managed to keep her family together and after extreme turmoil, was granted refuge in Utah one year ago.  When my wife and I, with our nonprofit Women of the World, went to their home, she and her husband are extremely malnourished since the basic act of eating over rotten teeth is painful.  Women of the World in collaboration with Fortis College donated free hygiene and checkups for D-'s family but students and instructors could do little for her pain or extreme problems.  D- and many like her need Medicaid dental services reinstated to enjoy and contribute in Utah.Let me tell a different story, a story of the future of D-'s grandson, who because of his drive, the desire to escape poverty, and the gift of American education and the entrepreneurial spirit, he becomes the next Sergey Brin, the co-founder of Google.  As a semiconductor engineering manager at IMFT, I can assure you that our greatest headway towards making Utah's Wasatch Valley the new Silicon Valley rests with young refugees like D-'s grandson.  He'll contribute where he feels most wanted, I urge you to make that place Utah.Please, follow the #1 recommendation from the Medicaid Medical Care Advisory Committee forwarded to you by the Department of Health to…RESTORE DENTAL SERVICES FOR ADULTS ENROLLED IN MEDICAID!Samira and Justin HarnishExecutive and Development Director for Women of the World